Arnold Galin was born in the Bronx and educated in Queens, New York. He received a BA in Speech, an MFA in Theater and an MS in Library Science from SUNY Albany. Upon graduation, he was employed as a Media Specialist first at BOCES and then at Rome Free Academy, a position he held for thirty years. While at Rome Free Academy he served as Drama Club Advisor, directing and producing numerous student productions. Simultaneously he conducted his own wedding photography business.

He has been President and Vice President of Rome Community Theater’s Board of Directors and volunteered at the theater for over thirty years; acting, producing and directing. Some of his more recent shows were Almost Maine, The Game Show, Kindertransport and Dr Jeckll No Place to Hide.

Currently Arnold is a traveling adjudicator for the Theatre Association of New York State.

G. Robert Reynolds was born in Newton, MA. He attended Colgate University as a Physics Major and following that was commissioned in the US Navy until 1946 when he was Honorably Discharged. He received a BFA and MFA at Syracuse University.

He moved to Rome in 1951 to become the Director of Art Education for the Rome City School District, a position he held for the next four years. Although he changed his career path to eventually become Vice President, Sales Manager for Canterbury Press he maintained his art skills by drawing and sketching.

After his retirement from Canterbury Press he dedicated his career and personal life to enhancing access to the visual arts through his teaching, practicing, and volunteering in the fields of painting, drawing, calligraphy and topography. His work covered a broad range including designing the logos for: The Lake Delta Yacht Club, The First Presbyterian Church, Sampo Swivels, and Canterbury Press. He took up watercolor and dedicated himself to the art form often experimenting and improving his technique while painting hundreds of images from nature. He received numerous awards for his watercolors shown throughout Central New York.

Jerome Durr was born in Rome and graduated from Rome Free Academy in 1965. He earned an AAA degree in Math and Sciences from Onondaga Community College, after which he volunteered for the Army. Upon his return home he started working with glass and participating in local craft shows. He attended evening art classes at University College at Syracuse University which helped him to develop the abilities to render designs for stained glass in watercolor.

In 1977 he opened a studio in Skaneateles, New York designing, fabricating and installing architectural stained glass in homes, churches and commercial buildings. In 1979 the studio added etching and carving on glass. Project sizes have varied from the small gallery piece to the large sculptural hanging commission. His impressive client list includes the Carlisle Corporation, the Dreyfus Corporation, the Everson Museum of Art, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and the chapel in Sing Sing Prison.

Jerome is an accredited member of the Stained Glass Association of America as well as the Past President and Director of the Stained Glass School. His work has been exhibited in many shows including the New York State Museum of Art and the Atlanta Art Glass Guild, where he was awarded Best of Show.

Jerome currently lives near Skaneateles and maintains a studio in Syracuse’s Delavan Center where he moved it to in 1987.

Kristen Kimball was born in 1971 in Rome, New York and graduated from Rome Free Academy. In 1994 upon her graduation from Harvard she moved to New York City where she worked at a literary agency, taught creative writing and freelanced form magazines and travel guides.

In 2002, she interviewed a wingnut farmer named Mark. At that point she made a major life change by marrying him and they created Essex Farm near Lake Champlain. Essex Farm is the world’s first full-diet CSA (Community Support Agriculture) enterprise. Kristin documented her journey in her book, The Dirty Life, a Memoir of Farming, Food and Love.

Since The Dirty Life was published she has written for O Magazine about what it’s like to change your life completely, for Vogue on physical work, and for Gourmet Live on several farm and food related subjects.

Jake Meiss’ earliest memories of music date back to when he was 18 months old and attended his first drum corps and marching band show.  He started Euphonium in 4th grade, and later attended Rome Free Academy, where he participated in various music programs, playing trombone, French horn and tuba.  Mr. Meiss majored in Music Education with a minor in Theatre at Pennsylvania State University and performed and travelled with the Marching Blue Band and the Singing Lions Show Choir.  
     He student-taught in Clearfield, PA, taught middle school chorus in Clinton NY, and then middle school and high school band in Mohawk, NY, prior to being hired as RFA’s Band Director in 2007.  Since then, he has revived, expanded, and created several programs including the Wind Ensemble, Concert Band, and Jazz Band, with the Wind Ensemble earning Gold Ratings on level VI repertoire at the NYSSMA Major Organizations Festival.  The Marching Black Knights have grown exponentially, and began competing in the fall of 2011 with musical arrangements and drills designed by Mr. Meiss.  He started RFA’s Rhapsody show choir in early 2011, creating their musical arrangements and choreography, and produced the first annual Student & Alumni Cabaret in 2010.  Jake Meiss has directed and choreographed two musicals for the Boys and Girls club, two for the Mohawk School District, and ten at RFA. 
     Mr. Meiss continues to appear on stage locally in many musical theatre productions and to play in pit orchestras; he has also participated in the Rome Community Concert Band.  

Billie Worth

Billie Worth was born Wilhelmina “Billie” Rothmund in Rome, NY (at Rome Hospital) on October 20, 1916. 

She began her performing career at the age of six, making her initial appearance at a local talent show at the Strand Theatre in Rome on March 26, 1923, with brother Coley and sister Grace.  She began her performance career in earnest that summer, touring with her siblings (billed as “Grace, Coley, and Billie Worth”).  An expert tennis player, the 14-year-old Rome Free Academy student became City Wide Woman’s Tennis Champion in 1931 and repeated her triumph in 1932.  

After contemplating a career as tennis pro, Miss Worth chose the stage, and made her Broadway debut in the last performance of the Gershwins’ Let ‘em Eat Cake in 1934, before embarking on the show’s national tour.  Her subsequent Broadway appearances include 1934’s Thumbs Up!, Higher and Higher in 1940, Bright Lights of 1944 and Cole Porter’s Seven Lively Arts in 1944, and Rogers and Hammerstein’s South Pacific in 1949, where she understudied Mary Martin.  (She performed the lead role in South Pacific 24 times on Broadway in Martin’s absence.)  Billie had been taught to dance by her brother, Coley, and often earned critical raves for her dancing.  In 1935 she married fellow actor Donald Burr, and two weeks later began her international career when the couple began appearances at the Grosvenor House in London. 
Billie Worth made her network television debut in 1951 in General Electric Guest House. She later guest starred in two episodes of The United States Steel Hour. In 1953 she starred in Irving Berlin’s Call Me Madam in London.  She retired from the professional stage in the late 1950s, but directed several productions with the community theater group the Chester (NJ) Players in the 1970s.  She presently resides in Florida and Connecticut and remains an avid tennis player.

Billie Worth

Billie Worth was born Wilhelmina “Billie” Rothmund in Rome, NY (at Rome Hospital) on October 20, 1916. 

She began her performing career at the age of six, making her initial appearance at a local talent show at the Strand Theatre in Rome on March 26, 1923, with brother Coley and sister Grace.  She began her performance career in earnest that summer, touring with her siblings (billed as “Grace, Coley, and Billie Worth”).  An expert tennis player, the 14-year-old Rome Free Academy student became City Wide Woman’s Tennis Champion in 1931 and repeated her triumph in 1932.  

After contemplating a career as tennis pro, Miss Worth chose the stage, and made her Broadway debut in the last performance of the Gershwins’ Let ‘em Eat Cake in 1934, before embarking on the show’s national tour.  Her subsequent Broadway appearances include 1934’s Thumbs Up!, Higher and Higher in 1940, Bright Lights of 1944 and Cole Porter’s Seven Lively Arts in 1944, and Rogers and Hammerstein’s South Pacific in 1949, where she understudied Mary Martin.  (She performed the lead role in South Pacific 24 times on Broadway in Martin’s absence.)  Billie had been taught to dance by her brother, Coley, and often earned critical raves for her dancing.  In 1935 she married fellow actor Donald Burr, and two weeks later began her international career when the couple began appearances at the Grosvenor House in London. 
Billie Worth made her network television debut in 1951 in General Electric Guest House. She later guest starred in two episodes of The United States Steel Hour. In 1953 she starred in Irving Berlin’s Call Me Madam in London.  She retired from the professional stage in the late 1950s, but directed several productions with the community theater group the Chester (NJ) Players in the 1970s.  She presently resides in Florida and Connecticut and remains an avid tennis player.